RAFFLES   BEATS   THE   MOA

Raffles Beats The MOA
The Ipswich Evening Star for 18th January 1986 reported that the longest serving member of the Ross Revenge crew, Raffles, didn't go short of Christmas goodies. As Raffles is not of British nationality, he's a foreign canine, he's not covered by the Marine Broadcasting Offences Act of 1967. It is therefore quite legal to deliver presents, etc from the UK mainland to him (you mustn't of course deliver anything to his human companions). A fund was set up for Raffles, called Treats Incorporated, by our friends at the Caroline Movement. More details were available from: Raffles D.T.I, Caroline Movement, BCM-BRFM, London WC1N 3XX.

Numbers 240 & 231
The 963khz service closed just after 02.00, on 31st January, "due to adverse weather conditions 963khz is now closing down, however we continue our transmissions on 558khz, so we invite you now to re-tune your radio receivers to 558khz. We now have some urgent numbers for our office, that's number 240 and number 231. So, on behalf of the Captain and the crew of the radio ship Ross Revenge, this is Michael Barrington wishing you a very good night and don't forget to re-tune to 558khz in the medium wave, good night". The close of 963 was said to be due to transmitter problems, and Ferry Eden gave an announcement in Dutch. The numbers 231 and 240 were repeated, to the sound of heavy weather in the background. 558khz went off the air at shortly after, in the middle of a record, without any announcement. The record incidentally was rather appropriate, by Status Quo Wild side of life.

Drifting
Just how serious things were in the Knock Deep became apparent later in the morning, when according to Ceefax, two lifeboats were launched at around 03.00 to help the Ross Revenge, that had lost its anchor in rough seas. The Ipswich Evening Star that day reported that the Sheerness and Margate lifeboats had been launched after the Ross Revenge's anchor cable had snapped in Force 8 gales and the ships crew had put out an emergency call on CB after their navigational equipment had failed. The ship had drifted to within two miles of British waters, where it could have been arrested. The CB call was picked up by Bryan Mole of Ipswich REACT, a voluntary group who monitor the emergency channel nine. He told the newspaper that the ships engineer said they had broken anchor and were drifting. He said they couldn't get their stand-by anchor down and didn't trust it anyway. Mr. Mole was asked to phone a London number to help alert a tug to assist the stricken radioship, although lifeboats had been launched, and coastguards alerted.

Raffles

Raffles

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Echo 31-1-1986

Press

Mirror 1-2-1986

Ross Revenge

 

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DJs line-up January 1986

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Raffles

Raffles

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